Ride Report: I-76, I-71, and U.S. 30, Youngstown, OH to Beaverdam, OH


Ride Date: March 28, 2017

For the past two years when I lived in Delaware, Ohio, I would take my touring bike out on a test ride from Delaware to a Speedway gas station near the indirect interchanges between I-75 and U.S. Route 30. The ride was exactly 200 miles round trip, which was just under one tank of gas on my FJR1300. Even though I moved to Youngstown, Ohio last year, I decided I would keep the tradition going, even though the ride is twice as long. If clearing the old, Stabil-containing gas out of the tank with a one-tank trip is good, two tanks is twice as good, right?

In any event, I got a late start but headed out from Youngstown around 930am. The ride took me up I-680, to I-80 until it changes to I-76 at the Ohio Turnpike interchange. I continued on I-76 through Akron, where I-76 overlaps with I-77 for a short bit, onto I-76’s western terminus at I-71. I got on I-71 at Exit 209, and got off at Exit 176 onto the U.S. Route 30 highway. I stayed on U.S. 30 until its interchange with the Lincoln Highway (old Route 30), which provides indirect access to I-75. There is a Speedway gas station just west of U.S. 30’s trumpet-style interchange ramp, but east of the I-75 alignment. After getting gas, buying a snack, and chatting with a another rider, I got back on U.S. 30, this time eastbound. The very unusual ramp from old U.S. 30 to U.S. 30 eastbound, which loops in the median of the freeway, can be a lot of fun for the peg-scrappers out there. I essentially repeated my route on the way back to Youngstown, except I decided to use the I-277 bypass around downtown Akron to I-77 North, which took me back to I-76 East. I was feeling a bit tired early into the ride back, and stopped at an Arby’s in Bucyrus for a quick snack. Nothing like a corned beef slider detour. I got home around 515pm.

Overall, and despite the rough winter, all road surfaces were in good condition. During my previous rides on U.S. 30 between Upper Sandusky and the I-75 interchange, only portions of the eastbound lanes had been paved with an odd asphalt. Now both sides of the divided highway have received the asphalt treatment. The asphalt is very ridable, it just has an usual texture about it. It feels both slightly slick and abrasive at the same time.

The route is very rural and does not offer a lot of scenic viewing opportunities, unless empty farm fields are your thing. However, I enjoy this route because it is four-lane, divided highway (with intersections, however) and is not heavily traveled. It is very effective as a toll-free thoroughfare between Canton, Ohio and Chicago/Gary. The route is also very effective as a test route. It allows a rider to maintain a normal highway pace (65-75mph) with little traffic and ample shoulder space in case something does go wrong and roadside repairs are needed.

My FJR1300 performed very well with no mechanical issues on its first extended use of the 2017 riding season. This was despite a heavy crosswind that is typical of wide-open freeways that run through flat, un-forrested terrain. After a successful test ride I can now have confidence that, barring unforeseen problems, the motorcycle is prepared for what will be a very busy 2017 riding reason.

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