Going the (First) Distance: An Introduction to Long-Distance Motorcycle Riding, Point #13 (Go with a Group)


One of the smartest things a new touring rider can do is go on their first tour with one or more experienced touring riders. This is not a topic I have a lot of experience with. I have only done one non-solo tour, and I was the more experienced rider in the pairing. However, if you have friends or family who are already long-distance riding enthusiasts, use their experience to your advantage.

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Among the benefits of doing one of your first tours with a group are:

Experienced perspective: Doing a group tour will give you insight into how other touring riders perceive long-distance riding, how they handle certain situations, and whether something you are experiencing is a normal part of touring or not.

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Pace setting: Allowing an experienced rider to lead the tour would allow a new touring rider to learn what touring pace they are comfortable with. Some touring riders really like to put the hammer down on the road, but take long breaks at each stop. Some touring riders are the exact opposite. By going with an experienced group, a new touring rider would be able to observe several different individuals’ pace, and find what pace is right for them.

Regional familiarity: An experienced touring rider may have knowledge of the area you are going touring in. This can make trip planning a lot easier, as the experienced rider can help find interesting things to see along the way and help you better plan the tour.

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Pooling tools: If a group is staying together for an entire tour, each rider does not need to bring their full tool set. Instead, the riders can divide tools among the group, giving everyone lighter luggage.

Safety: In the event some goes wrong and someone in the group crashes, breaks down, and/or is injured, the other riders can help out. Another rider can call for help or give the injured rider and ride to safety. It is also easier for motorists to see a group of motorcycles stopped on the side of the road rather than the narrow profile of only a single bike.

 

New touring riders also may have a hard time knowing when and how badly fatigue may start setting in. An experienced touring rider can look for signs of fatigue in a new rider on the road and at stops. This can be a literal lifesaver for a new long-distance rider.

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Before embarking on a group tour, it is important to know the norms of group riding. To review the AMA’s rules for group road rides, visit: www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Riding/Road-Riding-And-Touring.

 

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